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Accessibility
It is the goal of the Valhalla Union Free School District that the information on our website be accessible to individuals with visual, hearing or cognitive disabilities.

Good faith efforts have been made to ensure that our site complies with New York State standards on website accessibility (New York State OFT Policy, P04-002, Accessibility of State Agency Web-based Intranet and Internet Information and Applications) and with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, set forth by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to the best of our technical ability.

The majority of pages in our site are available in HTML format, which can be deciphered by screen readers. Some documents are in Adobe PDF format, which require Adobe Acrobat Reader to view. If you do not already have Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer, you can download it for free from the Adobe website. Some features on this site may require the Adobe Flash Player to view. If you don’t have the Adobe Flash Player, please visit the Adobe website to download it.

If you are unable to access any page or pages on our site, please email Natalia Baage-Lord, Public Relations Specialist, at nbaage-lord@swboces.org with detailed information on the location of the page or document you were attempting to access. Be sure to include your name, email address and phone number so that we may contact you to provide the information in another format.

Please note that some pages on Valhalla Union Free School District websites contain links to third-party sites, which are not within our control and may not comply with accessibility standards. The district is not responsible for the content or accessibility of third-party sites.



57 Million Americans Have a Disability
According to the new figures released by the Census Bureau on July 25, 2012, 56.7 million Americans (18.7% of the U.S. population) have some type of disability and out of this number, an estimated 38.3 million (12.6%) have a severe disability.

19.9 million (8.2%) have difficulty lifting or grasping. This could, for example impact their use of a mouse or keyboard.
8.1 million (3.3%) have a vision impairment. These people might rely on a screen magnifier or a screen reader, or might have a form of color blindness.
7.6 million (3.1%) have a hearing impairment. They might rely on transcripts and / or captions for audio and video media.
Over half of people with disabilities routinely browse the internet. Maintaining a website that is accessible to all people is a continuous and worthwhile effort. The current set of guidelines is laid out by the World Wide Web Consortium.

How is website accessibility evaluated?
Websites are evaluated for their accessibility using automated scanning tools as well as human inspection. The evaluations do not produce black and white results. Since every piece of your website is subject to evaluation, there can be components that are accessible at a lower level (WCAG 2.0 A) while others are accessible at a higher level (WCAG 2.0 AAA). Accessibility means making each page and every component as accessible as possible.

What are the legal requirements?
In the United States, applicable laws include The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Sections 504 and Section 508). Many international laws also address accessibility.
The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) provides an international set of guidelines. They are developed by the Worldwide Web Consortium (W3C), the governing body of the web. These guidelines are the basis of most web accessibility law in the world and the basis for upcoming changes in US law.